Merge or Die: Are Mergers the New Growth Catalyst in a Sluggish Economy?

As 2014 begins to take shape, many in the M&A industry are worried about a repeat of 2013, when conditions seemed ripe for deal making but those deals failed to execute.  Other than several mega deals, 2013 was largely disappointing. For context, world wide M&A was $4.27 trillion in 2007 on more than 40,000 transactions. Only a year later, 2008, we saw that amount fall to $1.9 trillion. Reuters estimates that private equity firms ended 2013 with $1.074 trillion in dry powder. Bain Capital has postulated that there is $300 trillion in capital laying dormant around the world that could be used for M&A. Capital is also still cheap, as interest rates remain relatively low. So, with all of these things pointing towards more deals being executed, when will it begin?

In a recent article from Institutional Investor, Robert Teitelman postulates that there could be a "new normal" in terms of how companies grow. In a low growth global environment, he says, acquisitions are one of the only ways to increase the size of your business. US GDP was a healthy 3.2% in Q4 2013 after being 4.1% in Q3, but other parts of the world are not showing that same growth. Most expected M&A activity to be back to pre-crisis levels by now, considering the health of the overall stock market and US economy. However, it has only rebounded to mid 2000s levels.

Chris Ruggeri is a principal in Deloitte’s financial advisory unit and leading manager of the firm’s M&A practice. She summed up the lack of deals by saying, “We’ve been sort of stuck. Confidence fuels growth. And growth fuels M&A. To get growth, you need confidence. It’s not there.”  Let's hope the confidence returns and deal makers start pulling the trigger, or 2014 could be a repeat of 2013.

Past Posts

Widget Category list not found.

Index was outside the bounds of the array.X