E-commerce Competition Intensifies: Megadeal between Google and eBay on the Horizon?

As reported by the San Jose Mercury News, Carl Icahn is at it again. One of the world's most active investors, Icahn is pressuring eBay to spin off its PayPal segment in a move that is intended to unlock value for current eBay shareholders. However, one analyst from Baird Equity Research seems to have a different idea, which he revealed in an investment note released on Monday. Baird analyst Colin Sebastian recently wrote that a merger could be "a possible 'best of both worlds' opportunity" that would accomplish Icahn's goals while allowing Google to shore up a struggling division. He continued to explain that, "we believe acquiring eBay/PayPal would be one way for Google to secure quickly a strong leadership position in commerce and payments, and likewise, could represent a better strategic option than alternatives proposed for eBay," The deal would certainly create a giant in the e-commerce space, with eBay potentially adding $75 billion to Google's already mammoth $400+ billion capitalization. Read the entire article here.

Actavis to Acquire Forest Laboratories for $25 Billion

Today, Actavis announced that they have entered into a definitive agreement to acquire Forest Laboratories. Forest is based in New York, NY, but has Midwest operations in Earth City, MO. The purchase price of $25 billion represents a 25% premium over Forest's stock price. The merger is expected to generate double digit accretion in 2015 and 2016, with approximately $1 billion in synergies to be realized within the first three years. If successfully completed, the merger would combine a generic juggernaut in Actavis with a leading name brand producer in Forest. If the transaction closes, the combined entity would have projected revenues of more than $15 billion in 2015, with strong free cash flows in excess of $4 billion. As 2014 rolls on, several interesting deals are coming to light. The Actavis-Forest merger announcement comes on the heels of a potential business combination of Comcast and Time Warner, which is estimated at ~$45 billion in value. Hopefully, these large deals will spur the lower middle and middle markets to follow suit, although the glut of megadeals in 2013 did not seem to have that impact. Read the full press release from Actavis here.

VC Valuation and Trends: Seed Series Rise, Most Other Rounds Fall

November 6, 2013 10:19 by Clayton Reeves in   //  Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,   //   Comments (0)
As reported by Pitchbook, the median pre-money valuation financings in 3Q 2013 fell across the board. The exceptions were Series Seed and Series C, both of which increased to new record highs. Valuatons have been trending higher for the last several years, but it had historically been most pronounced in later stage rounds (Series D or later). However, as we discussed several weeks ago, seed valuations are now skyrocketing, as well as Series C. As you can see above, the deal volume and capital invested has been relatively stable since mid-2012 after a volatile period from 2011 through first half of 2012. Read the entire report here.

A Busy Week in M&A!

As reported by Daily Finance, deal-makers have wrapped up three multi-billion dollar acquisitions so far this week as the markets get a late start thanks to Labor Day. This week has proven to be a busy one in terms of billion+ acquisitions, as three have been wrapped up already. Microsoft, Verizon and lesser known Jarden (consumer products) all completed deals with price tags over the billion dollar mark. Microsoft agreed to purchase Nokia's cellphone business for $7.2 billion in a move that has been anticipated by many. Controlling the business allows MSFT to make a more unified and coordinated challenge to Apple, Google and Samsung in the mobile market. This will allow the company to leverage their Windows platform, which has already gained more traction in mobile than many expected (although the desktop version has left much to be desired). Additionally relevant, and perhaps less obvious, is what impact the move will have on Microsoft's executive team moving forward. MSFT has "acquired" Nokia's CEO, Stephen Elop in the deal; Elop is a proven leader and will automatically be the top contender to succeed Steve Ballmer. Verizon's deal was more of a self purchase, as it completed the purchase of 45 percent of Verizon Wireless held by British Telecom giant Vodaphone. At a price of $130 billion, the cost was steep. However, this gives Verizon Communications full control of the company and its 100 million subscribers. Finally, in a deal that smells incredible, Jarden purchased privately held scent seller Yankee Candle, best known for its candles. That deal is valued at almost $1.8 billion. What does this mean for the wider market? It is difficult to tell. September is usually a bad month for stock markets, which could make M&A deal makers skittish. However, mega-deals of this nature are a good sign that activity in the second half may pick up as predicted. Read the entire article here.

Would Anyone Buy BlackBerry?

August 12, 2013 17:50 by Clayton Reeves in Capital Markets, M&A, Telecom  //  Tags: , , , ,   //   Comments (0)
Today, BlackBerry halted trading of their shares and announced their intentions to explore strategic alternatives in an effort to ensure their BlackBerry 10 release goes well.  They have formed a Special Committee of the Board in an effort to make these strategic plans more tangible. Timothy Dattels, Chairman of the aforementioned special committee, recently said, "During the past year, management and the Board have been focused on launching the BlackBerry 10 platform and BES 10, establishing a strong financial position, and evaluating the best approach to delivering long-term value for customers and shareholders."  This effort has apparently expanded beyond the walls of BlackBerry to include a potential corporate transaction. So, given the fact that BlackBerry is now exploring their options, what will we see happen in the next weeks and months? There are basically two options: BlackBerry can go private or they can be sold to another company. Going Private: This would remove the quarterly stress of earnings, continuously swirling negative sentiment and allow the company to reinvent itself from the relative privacy a private company enjoys. Right now, they are caught in a downward spiral of tremendously reduced market share, a series of failed products and an angry investor base. Going private could help to stem this tide. However, it won't change the intrinsic nature of the company, which has been producing some lackluster offerings in the mobile sphere. Selling the Company: This is the other primary alternative this special committee is most likely considering.Who would buy a former market leader that has been destroyed in recent years by Apple, Google and Microsoft? Well, Microsoft might be a potential landing spot for BlackBerry. The Windows Phone has picked up some steam, and Microsoft could have an interest in eating up BlackBerry's market share and trying to keep it for themselves. One intriguing possibility for BlackBerry would be a Chinese acquirer.  Companies like Huawei and ZTE have the capital and ambition necessary to play in the North American arena, and it may be more cost and time effective to resurrect a struggling brand like BlackBerry than start from scratch. So, there are two main alternatives for the committee to consider, both with potential pitfalls and challenges.  However, either option could prevent the only way for BlackBerry to halt their downward slide.  It will be interesting to see who comes forward in this process, vying for a chance to buy the former market leader. Click here to read the press release from BlackBerry.

Past Posts

Widget Category list not found.

Index was outside the bounds of the array.X