Capital Markets in 2025: What Will Change?

PricewaterhouseCoopers recently released a report on the state of capital markets in 2025.  The report expects a shift eastward, as would be expected by most market participants. This shift will increase the global horizon for many companies, and force them to look outside of their own country for growth opportunities, partners, acquisitions and even an exchange to list themselves on.  Almost three quarters of respondents said that emerging companies in particular will look to another emerging market for a listing.  Developed companies, the majority said, would prefer to list in another developed market. In terms of the might BRIC, only China has lived up to its billing so far.  80% of respondents thought that the Chinese market would be where the majority of listings occur by 2025.  For India and Brazil, 38% and 30% of respondents believe those markets will be important, respectively.  Russia is only thought to be an important market by about one in ten survey takers. This shift to emerging market exchanges will have wide implications for capital markets. Political, legal and regulatory uncertainty are all larger issues in a developing country.  Foreign investors will have to be opportunistic, but cautious when selecting investments in these new exchanges. Click here to read the report from PwC.

Chinese Investment in the U.S. Continues to Grow

July 10, 2013 09:32 by Clayton Reeves in Agriculture, Capital Markets, M&A  //  Tags: , , , , ,   //   Comments (0)
Despite political, regulatory, cultural and geographic obstacles to Chinese firms investing in the U.S., they continue to do so at a growing rate. Chinese figures show that their investment in the U.S. grew to $9.3 billion in 2012 from $1.88 billion in 2007. U.S. figures were even more extreme, concluding that the cumulative investment jumped from $3.4 billion to $22.8 billion in the same period.  The recently proposed acquisition of Smithfield Foods by Shuanghui International for $4.7 billion would represent the largest ever acquisition of a U.S. firm by a Chinese entity. Additionally, this acquisition could represent a threat to the U.S. food supply, which has generally been more protected through regulatory issues due to national interests. With many of the food related issues that Chinese firms have faced, either in the pet or human food arena, there is concern from regulators about the acquisition of Smithfield. Regardless of how the Smithfield acquisition turns out, one fact remains: the Chinese are interested in purchasing U.S. companies moving forward and have the dry powder to do so.  It will be interesting to see how this changes the M&A landscape moving forward. Click here to read the article this post references in the China Daily.

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